#Xcode

  1. Mac App Store: Embedding a Command Line tool using paths as arguments

    A couple of months ago, I released a new app called Dependencies on the Mac App Store. You can download and try it for free at https://apps.apple.com/app/dependencies/id1538972026. In this article, I explain how I built the command line support and released it in the Mac App Store. Implementing this feature turned out to be tricky, mostly due to the lack of documentation on this specific subject. This post might be of interest if you are planning to add a Command Line tool to your app distributed on the Mac App Store.
    [Read More]
  2. Identifying the type of build (Build, Archive) at compile time in Xcode

    Let’s say you want to have a different behavior in your app depending on whether you build it in Xcode or you perform an Archive. And you want this behavior to be done at compile time. Note that the use of different configurations is not what is wanted.
    [Read More]
  3. Detecting if an app runs in a 32-bit or 64-bit iOS Simulator

    With Xcode 5, it is now possible to compile an application for armv7 and/or arm64. You can compile an application as 32-bit and/or as 64-bit and you can run this application in a 32-bit or 64-bit iOS Simulator:
    [Read More]
  4. Using AddressSanitizer with Xcode 4.6.1

    Clang 3.3 now supports AddressSanitizer. Here is the description from the Clang 3.3 documentation:
    [Read More]
  5. Programmatically break into GDB

    You may want to stop into the debugger if something bad happened while executing your program. The easier way to do that is to have a breakpoint always set and to run your program in the debugger. But sometimes you want to break even if there are no breakpoint. For example you know that something is wrong now and your program will crash later.
    [Read More]
  6. libMallocDebug

    Here is a little description on how to use libMallocDebug for developers and QA people. It seems not many people know about it.
    [Read More]