#MacOS

  1. Mail.app plugin compatibility for macOS Sierra (10.12)

    Mail.app in macOS 10.11 and earlier used to check the plugins compatibility using the SupportedPluginCompatibilityUUIDs key in the plugin’s Info.plist. For example a Mail plugin would only be compatible with macOS 10.11.6 if its Info.plist contained the following: <key>SupportedPluginCompatibilityUUIDs</key> <array> <string>71562B89-0D90-4588-8E94-A75B701D6443</string> </array> Mail.app version 10.0 in macOS Sierra (10.12) now uses a different key to check the plugins compatibility. It now requires a key with the format Supported%ld.%ldPluginCompatibilityUUIDs where %ld.
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  2. Determining the running kernel mode on 10.6

    It might be useful in some cases to know if the MacOS kernel is running in the 32-bit or 64-bit (K64) mode. This is useful for example if you write an application like ‘System Profiler’ that displays the details of the currently running system: Obviously this post only applies to intel machines running on Snow Leopard (see my previous post ‘Intel 64-bit summary’). To simplify the code, I assume that you compiled your application with the 10.
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  3. Intel 64-bit summary

    Since people are confused regarding Intel 64-bit, here is a brief summary of what can run on which Intel processor. To run a 64-bit application, you obviously need a 64-bit processor. All the machines that Apple currently ships have a 64-bit processor. Only the ‘Intel Core Solo’ and ‘Intel Core Duo’ processors are 32-bit. On such machines, you won’t be able to run 64-bit apps. The ‘Intel Core 2 Duo’ and ‘Xeon’ processors are 64-bit.
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