#iOS

  1. Apple’s use of Swift in iOS 12

    Two years ago I measured Apple’s use of Swift in iOS 10.1 and last year I counted how many applications were using Swift in iOS 11.1. This year I’m analyzing iOS 12, released by Apple this month.
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  2. Apple’s use of Swift in iOS 11.1 and macOS 10.13.1

    A year ago I analyzed how many built-in apps in iOS 10.1 and macOS 10.12 were using Swift: Apple’s use of Swift in iOS 10.1 and macOS 10.12. How many built-in apps are using Swift in iOS 11.1 and macOS 10.13.1? Let’s find it out!
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  3. Deobfuscating libMobileGestalt keys

    /usr/lib/libMobileGestalt.dylib is a private library which provides an API to retrieve the capabilities of the iOS device, as well as some runtime information: system version, build version, device type, current status of the airplane mode, …
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  4. mach_portal: Improve amfid patch to support fat binaries

    Ian Beer did an incredible work with his iOS 10.1.1 exploit. The mach_portal proof of concept gives you a root shell on iOS 10.1.1. You can read more about it here: https://bugs.chromium.org/p/project-zero/issues/detail?id=965 While playing with it, I discovered that the amfid patch was only supporting thin arm64 binaries. I did not find a fix online so here is my solution.
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  5. Apple’s use of Swift in iOS 10.1 and macOS 10.12

    Swift has been announced at the WWDC 2014, more than 2 years ago. Most of the sample code projects from Apple are now written in Swift. But does Apple use Swift in iOS 10.1 and macOS 10.12.1?
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  6. Checking if Reduced Motion is enabled on iOS 7

    Apple introduced in iOS 7.0.3 a setting to reduce motion ( http://support.apple.com/kb/HT5595 ) : Settings -> General -> Accessibility -> Reduce Motion Sadly there is no public API to know if the user enabled “Reduce motion”.
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  7. Detecting the iOS device hardware architecture (32-bit/64-bit)

    In a previous post I explained how to detect if an app runs in a 32-bit or 64-bit iOS Simulator. It was not explaining how to detect if an iOS app runs on a 32-bit or 64-bit iOS device. This post aims at giving a generic method that can detect all cases:
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  8. Detecting if an app runs in a 32-bit or 64-bit iOS Simulator

    With Xcode 5, it is now possible to compile an application for armv7 and/or arm64. You can compile an application as 32-bit and/or as 64-bit and you can run this application in a 32-bit or 64-bit iOS Simulator:
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